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Thank you Frankfurt Book Fair and Buchmarkt and Waverley Books new Whisky Map by Neil Wilson and James McEwan made… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

waverley-books.co.uk/sto… We've tried to look at clans and tartans with new eyes. And a lovely map. Publishes next w… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

@realDonaldTrump Hello Sir, we are a Scottish publisher of books & genuine tartan journals. We are worried re: intr… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago in reply to realDonaldTrump

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If you like yellow tartan notebooks, look no further...

Lemon, lemon-chiffon, moccasin, peachpuff, pale gold, gold, khaki, yellow-green, olive, dark olive, lime-green, green-yellow, spring-green, primrose.

We've added in the notebooks with a yellow elastic. Yellow is the colour associated with freshness and hope. It is for sunshine and positivity, happiness and clarity, energy and optimism. It is for enlightenment and remembrance, primroses and light. But too much can be a bad thing and babies apparently cry more in an over-yellow room. It can also mean cowardice and deceit or can mean caution and sickness. Black and yellow are combined for school buses in America as the two colours together stand out from long distances.

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Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacLeod of Lewis tartan has a bright yellow background crossed with blacks, embellished with a filament of red.The MacLeods are Norse, descended from Leod, the son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann and the Isles. Leod’s sons were the progenitors of two main branches of the clan – the Clan of Torquil in Lewis and the Clan of Tormod in Skye and Harris.The MacLeods were vassals (subjects) of the Lords of the Isles but managed to avoid forfeiture of their lands after James IV had asserted his right over the Gaelic clans of the Hebrides. However, they were forced to defend their possessions with the sword against the interests of rival clans.Alasdair, 8th Chief of Harris (1450–1547), was one of the most distinguished of the MacLeod chiefs. In 1542 he obtained a charter for the lands of Trotternish on Skye, which had been the cause of a long feud between the MacDonalds and the MacLeods. He also built St Clements Church at Rodel in Harris and the Fairy Tower at Dunvegan Castle on Skye, the ancient seat of the MacLeod chief.While the principal branch of the family prospered under Alasdair, the line of Torquil was less fortunate. At the beginning of the 16th century the MacLeod lands in Lewis, and those acquired through marriage at Assynt in Sutherland, were forfeited after the MacLeod chief supported Donald Dubh in his attempt to claim the Lordship of the Isles. Although the lands were restored a few years later, the clan was weakened by internal disputes at the beginning of the 17th century and their lands passed to the Mackenzies through marriage. The MacLeod of Lewis tartan is one of the most recognisable designs, first depicted in a portrait dating from around 1830.
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