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Thank you Frankfurt Book Fair and Buchmarkt and Waverley Books new Whisky Map by Neil Wilson and James McEwan made… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

waverley-books.co.uk/sto… We've tried to look at clans and tartans with new eyes. And a lovely map. Publishes next w… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

@realDonaldTrump Hello Sir, we are a Scottish publisher of books & genuine tartan journals. We are worried re: intr… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago in reply to realDonaldTrump

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If you like black and dark tartan notebooks, look no further...

Black. We're thinking inky, dark, sable, coal, raven, ebony, jet, gun-metal, night, sooty, and the associations of this colour are very strong: power, sophistication, authority, rebellion, strength, elegance, Armani, formality, death, funereal, mystery. Think Ian Fleming's Mr Bond also, and his dark suits, and the cutting dash of the After Eight mint, and a black tie event. Lovely. Some people won't wear it, others wear only black. It's striking and makes a statement.However, we have added notebooks/journals with black threads in this category, as we had differing views here in the office. Colour is always subjective after all...

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A Red, Red Rose, Burns Check: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookA Red, Red Rose, Burns Check: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £8.50ViewAvailable from 20 January 2020Black and White Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookBlack and White Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £7.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Black and White Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookBlack and White Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £9.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Dress Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £14.99ViewThe Waverley Dress Large tartan notebook is hardback, 21cm x 13cm with 192 pages made of 80gsm quality paper. The colours of the tartan feature white – a characteristic of many dress tartans. The other colours are navy, two shades of burgundy, moss green, cream and black. Just as Hunting tartans used dark colours for hunting, in the same way most Dress tartans adopted white for dress occasions. Dress Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £7.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Dress Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £9.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook –  Kinloch Anderson (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Kinloch Anderson (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Waverley Kinloch Anderson large notebook/journal is hardback, 21cm x 13cm, with 192 pages (80gsm acid-free, FSC), and bound in the Kinloch Anderson tartan. The tartan is a rich combination of earthy browns, greens and golds, with a bold vein of dark red. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Black Watch (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Black Watch (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Black Watch tartan is a rich, dark green and blue laced with black.The Black Watch was formed in the wake of the unsuccessful 1715 Jacobite Rebellion, where James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1766), son of the deposed James II, fought to put the exiled House of Stuart back on the throne. From 1725, General George Wade (1673–1748) formed six military companies from the clans of the Campbells, Grants, Frasers and Munros. They were stationed in small detachments across the Highlands to prevent fighting among the clans, deter raiding, and to assist in enforcing laws against the carrying of weapons. In short, they were tasked with protecting the interests of the Hanoverian throne in Scotland. Wade issued an order in May 1725, for the companies all to wear plaid of the same sort and colour. Their original uniform was made from a 12-yard long plaid of the tartan that we know now as the Black Watch tartan. They wore a scarlet jacket and waistcoat, with the tartan cloth worn over the left shoulder. The name is said to come from the dark tartan they wore, hence “black”, and from the fact that they were policing the land, hence “watch”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Ferguson tartan is a dark forest green with thin white and red accents.Ferguson means “son of Fergus”. In Gaelic, MacFhaerghuis, or the anglicised MacFergus, can also be translated as “son of the angry one”. There are Fergusons (or Fergussons) all over Scotland, and though it is not possible to ascribe one common ancestry to a patronymic name of this type, the clan’s history contains several stories of the origins of Fergusons in different areas of Scotland. There were branches of the clan all over Scotland, from Dumfriesshire through Argyll and Perthshire to Aberdeenshire and Ross-shire. These had separate chiefs, though the chief of the Fergussons of Kilkerran in Ayrshire has been recognised since the 18th century as the chief of all the Fergusons. The clan’s own history claims that the Fergusons of Strachur in Argyll can be traced back to Fergus Mór mac Eirc, who led his people, the “Scoti”, from Antrim in Ireland to settle in Argyll and establish the ancient tribal kingdom of Dalriada (Dál Riata), a Gaelic overkingdom that included parts of western Scotland and northeastern Ulster in Ireland in the 5th and 6th centuries.Records link the Fergusons of Dumfriesshire and Ayrshire with Fergus of Galloway (d. 1161) who was founder of Dundrennan Abbey. He was: father of Gilbert, or Gilla Brigte mac Fergusa, of Galloway (d. 1185); grandfather of Duncan, or Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick (d. 1250); and great-great-grandfather to Robert Bruce (1274–1329). This branch of the clan appears to have held estates in Kilkerran from medieval times, and they remain the principal clan family. Another important branch are the Fergusons of Dunfallandy in Atholl, who were recognised as the principal Highland family of the clan.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Fraser Modern RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Fraser Modern RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe vibrant Fraser Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with details in blue, green and white. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacGregor tartan is an intense red with broad bands of blacks and a single white highlight.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacKay Ancient tartan is a blend of cool blues and greens interlaced with bands of black.This ancient clan, originally known as Clan Morgan and the Clan Aoidh, occupied lands in Durness, from the northwest peninsula of Cape Wrath, extending eastward to the border of Caithness and south to the northern edge of Sutherland. The MacKays are believed to be descendants of the Royal House of Moray, one of the seven Celtic earldoms. Iye Mac Eth (c. 1208–68), the progenitor of the clan, was Chamberlain to the Bishop of Caithness. His son, Iye Mór, acquired the Durness lands through marriage to the bishop’s daughter in 1263.In the 15th century Angus Dubh (d. 1433), the 7th chief, stood against Donald, Lord of the Isles, when the latter invaded Sutherland in his attempt to assert his claim to the Ross earldom. The invaders were victorious, and Angus was imprisoned until Donald’s defeat at the battle of Harlaw in 1411 forced a reconciliation. Angus later married Donald’s sister, Elizabeth, thereby acquiring further lands. In 1427 it was documented that Angus was the leader of a force of 4,000 men, a reflection of how much power he had accumulated.From the 16th century, the MacKays’ influence began to wane as their lands came under constant attack from the Gordon clan, who had acquired the earldom of Sutherland by force and sought to extend their territory. By the end of the century, the MacKay chief had become reduced to the status of vassal to the Gordon chief. The clan suffered in the 19th-century Highland Clearances and in 1829 the chief sold what remained of their lands to the house of Sutherland.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacLeod of Lewis tartan has a bright yellow background crossed with blacks, embellished with a filament of red.The MacLeods are Norse, descended from Leod, the son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann and the Isles. Leod’s sons were the progenitors of two main branches of the clan – the Clan of Torquil in Lewis and the Clan of Tormod in Skye and Harris.The MacLeods were vassals (subjects) of the Lords of the Isles but managed to avoid forfeiture of their lands after James IV had asserted his right over the Gaelic clans of the Hebrides. However, they were forced to defend their possessions with the sword against the interests of rival clans.Alasdair, 8th Chief of Harris (1450–1547), was one of the most distinguished of the MacLeod chiefs. In 1542 he obtained a charter for the lands of Trotternish on Skye, which had been the cause of a long feud between the MacDonalds and the MacLeods. He also built St Clements Church at Rodel in Harris and the Fairy Tower at Dunvegan Castle on Skye, the ancient seat of the MacLeod chief.While the principal branch of the family prospered under Alasdair, the line of Torquil was less fortunate. At the beginning of the 16th century the MacLeod lands in Lewis, and those acquired through marriage at Assynt in Sutherland, were forfeited after the MacLeod chief supported Donald Dubh in his attempt to claim the Lordship of the Isles. Although the lands were restored a few years later, the clan was weakened by internal disputes at the beginning of the 17th century and their lands passed to the Mackenzies through marriage. The MacLeod of Lewis tartan is one of the most recognisable designs, first depicted in a portrait dating from around 1830.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacMillan Modern BlackWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacMillan Modern BlackOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacMillan Modern Black tartan has plummy reds and blacks crossed with broad gold bands, and thin stripes of forest green. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThere are several tartans associated with the MacRae clan, but this attractive MacRae Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with dark blue and dark green. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MalcolmWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MalcolmOur price: £9.99ViewThe Malcolm tartan is dark blue-green background with contrasting yellow, blue and red lines.The clans Malcolm and MacCallum are joined. The names sound alike and have similar derivations, depending on which history you read. Although some historians suggest they are related, others are of the opinion that they are not genealogically linked at all. In 1779, the chief of the Clan MacCallum, Dugald MacCallum, the ninth of Poltalloch, adopted the name Malcolm after inheriting the Malcolm estate, and the two clans were joined together under the same chief.The name Malcolm has the privilege of being the first name of four of Scotland’s kings and comes from the Early Gaelic words Mael Coluimb meaning monk of Saint Columba (521–597), the Irish Abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity around what is now Scotland. (Mael literally means shavenhead.) MacCallum comes from the Gaelic MacChaluim meaning the son of Callum, while some say MacCallum is derived from Mac Ghille Chaluim which means “son of the disciple of Columba”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart HuntingWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart HuntingOur price: £9.99ViewThe Stewart Hunting tartan is a dark blend of greens, blues and blacks with thin highlights of yellow and red.The name of this illustrious and royal family is spelled two ways – Stewart and Stuart – but it was not spelled Stuart until the time of Mary, Queen of Scots. Mary, betrothed at the age of five to the Dauphin, Francis II of France, spent 13 years at the French Court. To enable her French associates to pronounce the Stewart name more easily it was decided to respell it without the troublesome “w”. “Hunting” tartans can be dated back to the 16th century. Clans who wore bright colours had the idea of making them more sombre and serviceable for everyday or hunting wear, replacing a prominent colour in the main tartan with a dark colour, but retaining the arrangement of the stripes so that they still showed the clan pattern. There are over 30 tartans associated with the Stewart clan. The differences incorporate different branches of the clan, different areas of origin and further variations using the labels “dress” and “hunting”. Royal Stewart tartan is dominated by a vibrant red, Stewart of Appin has lighter greens and blues and the Fraser Stewart of Atholl tartan is mostly red with blocks of blue, green and purple. The Stewart Hunting tartan is a variation on the Stewart tartan but is predominantly green and black with overchecks of red, yellow and blue. In 1848, Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert bought Balmoral Castle. Prince Albert took care of interior decoration, where he used red Royal Stewart and the green Stewart Hunting tartan for carpets, and Dress Stewart for curtains and upholstery.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe Wallace Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with black,and touches of yellow.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Black Watch tartan is a rich, dark green and blue laced with black .The Black Watch was formed in the wake of the unsuccessful 1715 Jacobite Rebellion, where James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1766), son of the deposed James II, fought to put the exiled House of Stuart back on the throne. From 1725, General George Wade (1673–1748) formed six military companies from the clans of the Campbells, Grants, Frasers and Munros. They were stationed in small detachments across the Highlands to prevent fighting among the clans, deter raiding, and to assist in enforcing laws against the carrying of weapons. In short, they were tasked with protecting the interests of the Hanoverian throne in Scotland. Wade issued an order in May 1725, for the companies all to wear plaid of the same sort and colour. Their original uniform was made from a 12-yard long plaid of the tartan that we know now as the Black Watch tartan. They wore a scarlet jacket and waistcoat, with the tartan cloth worn over the left shoulder. The name is said to come from the dark tartan they wore, hence “black”, and from the fact that they were policing the land, hence “watch”.
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