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Thank you Frankfurt Book Fair and Buchmarkt and Waverley Books new Whisky Map by Neil Wilson and James McEwan made… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

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If you like red tartan notebooks, look no further...

We've gathered the tartan notebooks we produce with a focus on red, so if you like red - welcome.

 

What's in a name? Quite a lot, actually:

Scarlet, vermilion, pillar-box, ruby, ruby-red, cherry, cherry-red, claret, wine, wine-red, flaming-red, flame, russet-red, blood red, rose, foxy, reddish, damask, sanguine, cerise, cardinal, cochineal, rufescent, vermeil, crimson, dark red, bruised red, incarnadine, or 'I just like red'. This is the place for you.

Found 24 products.

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Dress Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £14.99ViewThe Waverley Dress Large tartan notebook is hardback, 21cm x 13cm with 192 pages made of 80gsm quality paper. The colours of the tartan feature white – a characteristic of many dress tartans. The other colours are navy, two shades of burgundy, moss green, cream and black. Just as Hunting tartans used dark colours for hunting, in the same way most Dress tartans adopted white for dress occasions. Dress Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £7.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Dress Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookDress Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £9.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Rowanberry Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookRowanberry Tartan: Mini with pen: 10.5 x 7.5cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £7.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Rowanberry Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookRowanberry Tartan: Pocket: 14 x 9cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £9.99ViewThis series of Tartan Notebooks celebrates Scottish Traditions – the many unique features of Scotland and its people. History, clans and tartans, the landscape of Scotland – hills, glens, mountains, lochs and rivers guarded by the many castles and strongholds of Scotland, some ancient and ruined, but each one full of history, with a story to tell.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook –  Cameron of Erracht (Large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Cameron of Erracht (Large)Our price: £14.99View Available from 1 June 2019
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (large)Our price: £14.99View Available from 1 June 2019Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Caledonia (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Caledonia (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe vibrant Caledonia tartan has a sea-green background overlaid with broad red banding, with accents of black, white and yellow.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Cameron of ErrachtWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Cameron of ErrachtOur price: £9.99ViewThe Cameron of Erracht tartan has a lively palette of green, red and yellow interspersed with black and dark blue.The Cameron of Erracht tartan, a blend of the MacDonald and Cameron tartans, was designed in 1793 for the regiment of the 79th or Cameron Highlanders. The Cameron of Erracht clan is a branch of Clan Cameron, a West Highland Scottish clan. The Camerons, were among the strongest of the Highland clans with a reputation for bravery, and they commanded the “Road to the Isles” (an area from Corpach in the Highlands, towards the Western Isles).Donald Cameron, 7th of Erracht, was born shortly before the Jacobite Rising of 1715. He fought for Charles Edward Stuart (“Bonnie Prince Charlie”) in the Jacobite Rising of 1745, and, under Cameron of Lochiel, was second in command of the Camerons at Glenfinnan in Lochaber where the rebellion began.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Fraser Modern RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Fraser Modern RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe vibrant Fraser Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with details in blue, green and white. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hamilton RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hamilton RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe Hamilton Red tartan displays an even mix of bright red and blue with a subtle white accent.The House of Hamilton is a lowland Scottish family with auspicious connections. Numerous members throughout history have held high office, titles and substantial territories thoughout Scotland. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacBethWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacBethOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacBeth tartan is a very colourful balance of reds, blues and greens with white and yellow highlights.Most of us are familiar with the name MacBeth, or Macbeth, through Shakespeare’s play of that name. In Scottish history it is said that King Macbeth, Mac Bethad mac Findláich (c.1005–57) was the grandson of King Malcolm II, and his wife (Gruoch) was the granddaughter of King Kenneth III. The real king bore little resemblance to Shakespeare’s creation, though he did kill the ruling king, Duncan I, in battle, and he was killed by Malcolm Canmore (later Malcolm III) in 1056.But, surprisingly, the surname MacBeth is not related to him. The surname has the look of a patronymic name (“son of ...”) but it is not. Mac Bethad (or, in modern Gaelic, MacBheatha), means “son of life”. The surname MacBeth is associated with a family of hereditary physicians, thought to have originated in Ireland, who practised medicine for the Lords of the Isles. They were employed by every Scottish monarch between Robert I (d. 1329) and Charles I (d. 1649). Some changed their name to Beaton. Some migrated to the west coast and Mull. Others went to Inverness, Sutherland, Easter Ross and Moray. The MacBeths/Beatons are sometimes called the “Beaton Medical Kindred”, and they are listed as a sept of the clans MacBean and Maclean. The MacBeth tartan in which this notebook is bound is based on the Royal Stewart sett.There is another Beaton family, with an ancestral line originating in Fife and Angus, but their name is derived from the French placename Béthune. They are not related to the Irish MacBeth/Beatons but, confusingly, they also practised medicine. The Bethunes have their own crest and tartan (designed in 1997 by Phil Smith) but they are listed as a sept of clans MacLeod and MacDonald. About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with 80 gsm acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the MacBeth tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-435-7Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDonaldWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDonaldOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacDonald tartan bears a lattice of bright red over a dark background of blue and green.If your surname is MacDonald then you belong to the Clan Donald. There are several branches of the clan with origins all around the Highlands of Scotland: including Islay, Glen Garry near Fort William, Lochaber, Glen Coe in the north of Argyll, and Ardnamurchan on the west coast. The branches of Clan Donald were determined by the different lands granted to the descendants of Donald of Islay. Their main stronghold was Loch Finlaggan on Islay where they held their court.The Clan Donald is the largest of the Highland Clans and is often described as the most powerful. The Clan Donald was descended from Donald, grandson of the heroic Somerled, Lord of the Isles (d. 1164). Donald’s grandson, Angus Og (d. 1330), was granted vast lands in the Highlands and Western Isles by Robert the Bruce, whom he had supported in the fight for Scottish independence.Angus had two sons, one of whom, John, became Lord of the Isles (d. 1386), while the other, Iain (d. 1368), was the progenitor of the MacDonalds of Glencoe. The name MacDonald is, of course, at the centre of one of the most famous stories in Scottish history, the Massacre of Glencoe of 1692, in which 38 clan members were slaughtered by a Highland regiment under the command of Robert Campbell of Glenlyon (1630–96), on the orders of John Dalrymple, Secretary of State for Scotland (1648–1707).There are at least 27 different tartan setts associated with the Clan Donald. Their motto is Per mare per terras, “by sea and by land”. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacGregor tartan is an intense red with broad bands of blacks and a single white highlight.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacLean of Duart (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacLean of Duart (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe MacLean of Duart tartan is a rich blend of reds and dark green fretted with pale blue, yellow and white. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Maclean of Duart (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Maclean of Duart (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Maclean of Duart tartan is a rich blend of reds and dark green fretted with pale blue, yellow and white.The Macleans claim descent from Gillean of the Battleaxe, a kinsman of Fergus Mor, the sixth-century ruler of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada. The progenitor of the clan was Lachlan Lubanach who lived in the late 14th century. Lachlan was married to the daughter of the 1st Lord of the Isles and from him received lands in Mull. Mull is an island located off the west coast of Scotland. Lachlan is recorded as being the first Maclean to occupy Duart Castle, the ancient stronghold of the Maclean chiefs. At the end of the 15th century, James IV (1473–1513) successfully challenged the power and independence of the Gaelic clans, and in 1493 Lachlan Maclean was stripped of his lands and titles. The Macleans, who had supported the monarch, received royal confirmation of their possessions and titles, which now included lands in Tiree, Jura, Islay, Morvern and Lochaber.During the 16th century the Campbells emerged as the most powerful clan in the West Highlands. Several marriages took place between the Macleans and the Campbells, but the match between Lachlan Maclean and the daughter of the 2nd Earl of Argyll proved disastrous. Lachlan despised his wife so much that he marooned her on a rock in the Sound of Mull and left her to drown, before reporting her death to her family. However, the lady was rescued by fishermen and returned to her clan, and her brother stabbed Lachlan to death in revenge for his cruelty.Duart Castle fell to the Hanoverians during the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion and was unoccupied until 1911, when it was repurchased and renovated by the clan chief.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacPherson Red tartan is a warm blend of reds and blues which is crossed with black, green, bright yellow and white.The Scottish Gaelic for MacPherson, Mac a’ Phersein, means “son of the parson”. The Celtic church allowed priests to marry, and as an occupational name, you’ll find families with the name throughout Scotland. As a clan, the progenitor of the chiefs of Clan MacPherson is believed to have been a man named Muriach (or Muireach) Cattenach who was the parson of Kingussie in Badenoch. MacPhersons originated in Lochaber, though they were given lands in Badenoch – now the district of Badenoch and Strathspey in the Scottish Highlands – by Robert the Bruce as reward for defeating the Comyns (or Cummings) who were Bruce’s bitter enemies. MacPhersons are said to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan – which is a confederation of several clans – in the 12th century before that clan came under Mackintosh leadership. The Clan Chattan is sometimes referred to as the “Clan of the cats” because many of its constituent clans have a wild cat in their clan badge. The MacPherson clan motto is “Touch not the cat but a glove”, meaning “Don’t touch the cat without gloves”.The clan fought for Montrose in the Civil War (1642–49). They supported the Stuart cause during the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745.There is an annual Clan Gathering held at Newtonmore every August and there is also a Clan Museum in that town. The home of the current Chief, Sir William Alan MacPherson of Cluny and Blairgowrie, is Newton Castle, Blairgowrie.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the MacPherson Red tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-427-2Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThere are several tartans associated with the MacRae clan, but this attractive MacRae Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with dark blue and dark green.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThere are several tartans associated with the MacRae clan, but this attractive MacRae Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with dark blue and dark green. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – RobertsonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – RobertsonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Robertson tartan is an intense red crossed with broad bands of navy and dark green.Clan Robertson, the Gaelic Clann DhÒnchaidh, “children of Duncan”, claims descent from Duncan I, King of Scots (who ruled 1034–1040). Donnachadh Reamhar (Duncan the Stout – stout-hearted rather than “fat”) son of Andrew of Atholl, was the first recognised chief of the clan in the early 14th century, and his family were known as Duncanson. Duncan’s relatives and followers are said to have supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn (1314). Duncan is said to have been killed at the Battle of Neville’s Cross (1346), and was succeeded by his eldest son Robert. The Robert from whom the clan takes its name though, is Robert Riabach (“Grizzled”) who in 1437 captured the murderers of King James I. As a reward, King James II gave Robert a charter in which all of his lands were made into a feudal barony. The barony in Perthshire was called Struan and the chiefs of the clan were from then onwards known as Robertson of Struan. Afterwards, the clan remained faithful to the Stewart Earls of Atholl. The Robertsons fought under Montrose for Charles I. Alexander Robertson, 17th of Struan (c. 1669–1749), is said to have led 600 clansmen to join Bonnie Dundee (John Graham of Claverhouse, c. 16481689) at the Battle of Killiecrankie (1689), but arrived too late. He fought in the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Rebellions. The clan’s most precious relic, carried by all Robertson chiefs since the battle of Bannockburn, is the Clach na Brataich, a clear stone that was unearthed when the chief’s standard pole was pulled out of the ground while on the march to the battle. The clan’s motto is Virtutis gloria merces, “Glory is the reward of valour”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Royal Stewart (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Royal Stewart (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Royal Stewart tartan is a rich red with black banding, crossed with a myriad of yellow, blue, green and white.The progenitor of this noble family was a Breton, Alan Fitz Flaad (fl. c. 1090c. 1120). In England, Alan was appointed Sheriff of Shropshire by Henry I. His son Walter Fitz Alan (1106–1177), was created High Steward of Scotland in the reign of David I (1084–1153), an office where the duties included managing the King’s finances. The title was made hereditary in the family by Malcolm IV. Walter, the 3rd High Steward of Scotland (d. 1246), assumed the name of his office as his family surname, Stewart. Walter the 6th High Steward (1296–1327) married Marjory Bruce (d. 1246), the daughter of King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329). When David II died (1324–1371), he was succeeded by Walter Stewart’s son, Robert (1316–1390), 1st of the Royal House of Stewart. King Robert II’s eldest son John, succeeded as Robert III (1337–1405). The royal line of male Stewarts was uninterrupted until the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots (1542–1587). Mary was executed for supposedly plotting against Elizabeth I of England. Her son James VI became James I of England (1566–1625) and ruled for 57 years. His son Charles I was beheaded for defying the government and Charles II was deposed because of his religion. James VII and II, married to Mary of Modena, produced a Catholic heir, James Francis Edward Stuart. For this James II was deposed and the family exiled in France. In 1702, claiming his father’s lost throne, James Francis was attainted for treason in London, and his titles forfeited. The Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745 in Scotland, aimed, but failed, to put a Stewart (now Stuart) back on the Scottish throne.The Royal Stewart “sett” is known as “the Royal Tartan”. The Stewarts have several tartans, the Royal being the most famous.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe Wallace Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with black,and touches of yellow. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Caledonia (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Caledonia (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe vibrant Caledonia tartan has a sea-green background overlaid with broad red banding, with accents of black, white and yellow.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Royal Stewart (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Royal Stewart (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Royal Stewart tartan is a rich red with black banding, crossed with a myriad of yellow, blue, green and white.The progenitor of this noble family was a Breton, Alan Fitz Flaad (fl. c. 1090c. 1120). In England, Alan was appointed Sheriff of Shropshire by Henry I. His son Walter Fitz Alan (1106–1177), was created High Steward of Scotland in the reign of David I (1084–1153), an office where the duties included managing the King’s finances. The title was made hereditary in the family by Malcolm IV. Walter, the 3rd High Steward of Scotland (d. 1246), assumed the name of his office as his family surname, Stewart. Walter the 6th High Steward (1296–1327) married Marjory Bruce (d. 1246), the daughter of King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329). When David II died (1324–1371), he was succeeded by Walter Stewart’s son, Robert (1316–1390), 1st of the Royal House of Stewart. King Robert II’s eldest son John, succeeded as Robert III (1337–1405). The royal line of male Stewarts was uninterrupted until the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots (1542–1587). Mary was executed for supposedly plotting against Elizabeth I of England. Her son James VI became James I of England (1566–1625) and ruled for 57 years. His son Charles I was beheaded for defying the government and Charles II was deposed because of his religion. James VII and II, married to Mary of Modena, produced a Catholic heir, James Francis Edward Stuart. For this James II was deposed and the family exiled in France. In 1702, claiming his father’s lost throne, James Francis was attainted for treason in London, and his titles forfeited. The Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745 in Scotland, aimed, but failed, to put a Stewart (now Stuart) back on the Scottish throne.The Royal Stewart “sett” is known as “the Royal Tartan”. The Stewarts have several tartans, the Royal being the most famous.
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