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Thank you Frankfurt Book Fair and Buchmarkt and Waverley Books new Whisky Map by Neil Wilson and James McEwan made… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

waverley-books.co.uk/sto… We've tried to look at clans and tartans with new eyes. And a lovely map. Publishes next w… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 month ago

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If you like blue tartan notebooks, look no further...

We have put together the tartans with a blue focus. Blue symbolises trust. It is the brand for peace, wisdom, loyalty, confidence, faith, intelligence, truth and heaven. It is a radiant blue sea and a lovely blue sky. It is infinity and the horizon. It slows human beings down and it brings us tranquility and calm. Dark blue has connotations of depth, experience and expertise. Uniforms, and corporate America use it - Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, the capital letter of Google, and Boots the Chemist in the UK. We trust blue.

Blue-green, indigo, navy, royal, cobalt, beryl, azure, lapis lazuli, cerulean, celestial blue.

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Blue Loch Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookBlue Loch Tartan: Large: 21 x 13cm: Scottish Traditions: Waverley Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace NotebookOur price: £14.99ViewThe colour shades of the Blue Loch Tartan Large notebook (21cm x 13cmm, hardback, with 192 pages) include the blue and white of the Scottish saltire and other blues which reflect Scotland’s lochs and rivers – iconic features of the Scottish landscape. The sky blue with gold over check symbolise a fine Scottish summer’s day.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (large)Our price: £14.99View Available from 1 June 2019Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (pocket size)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (pocket size)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Anderson tartan’s predominant colour is a cool mid blue, and is crossed with red, yellow, black and white.The names Anderson and MacAndrew are connected with St Andrew. The popularity of the first name Andrew and the associated patronymic surnames meaning “son of Andrew” – with MacAndrew used in the Highlands, and Anderson in the Lowlands – means their use is very widespread, and so no exact origin of the names has been established. Gillanders, the Scottish Gaelic form, has the meaning “servant of Andrew”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Campbell AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Campbell AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Campbell Ancient tartan’s palette is restful blues and greens overset with bands of black.Clan Campbell was the most powerful clan in the southern Highlands of Scotland. Tradition has it that the clan is descended from Diarmid – a Celtic mythological hero – hence the reason why they are known as the “Race of Diarmid”. Historically, their ancestors were almost certainly of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada (or Dál Riata) and were probably a family of high rank. Their name in Gaelic is Caimbuel – which translates as “wry or crooked mouth”.In common with many of the Scottish clans, the Campbells were keen to extend their territories and their power. The degree to which they achieved this aim was due, in part, to their willingness to cooperate with the Lowland Scotland power base.At the height of their power they held extensive lands throughout Argyll, in Perthshire, Ayrshire, Inverness-shire and on the islands of Mull and Islay. With the Lords of the Isles disempowered and dispossessed by James IV, the authority of the Campbell chief in the southern Highlands became almost regal. The powerful clan chiefs inspired both loyalty and courage in their kinsmen and in the mid-18th century it was estimated that the Campbell strength stood at 5,000 men.The principal branch of the clan is that of Argyll, which was created a dukedom in 1701. Other important branches are those of Cawdor, Breadalbane and Loudoun which have their own tartans. The Campbell Ancient tartan has the same sett as the Black Watch – raised by the Duke of Argyll in 1739 and served by members of the clan – but it uses lighter shades of blue and green.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Douglas AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Douglas AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Douglas Ancient tartan is composed of blue and green with a narrow band of black and a thin white stripe.There are many legends of the origin of this powerful family but, remarkably, a definitive account has never been established. It is believed that the name was derived from Douglas Water in Lanarkshire, and the first record of the name appears in the late 12th century.Sir William Douglas, “le Hardi” (c. 1243c. 1298), was governor of the Borders town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, when it was besieged by the English. Douglas was taken prisoner and forced to swear loyalty to the English king, Edward I, although he later fought alongside William Wallace for the independence of Scotland. Berwick-upon-Tweed was founded in Saxon times and has changed hands many times between Scotland and England. (Today Berwick-upon-Tweed is in Northumberland, England, and is still only three miles from the Scottish border...)His son, the “Good Sir James” or “The Black Douglas” (c. 1286–1330), was a close companion to Robert the Bruce, and he fulfilled his king’s dying wish by carrying Robert’s heart into battle against the Moors in Spain, where he himself was killed.The fortunes of the Douglas family increased with the marriage of James, 2nd Earl of Douglas (c. 1358–1388), to a princess of the Royal House of Stewart. By the middle of the 15th century they had accumulated so much power that they were regarded as a danger to the stability of the nation. In 1440 the 6th Earl was executed after being lured to Edinburgh Castle by an invitation to dine with the young King James II. In 1452 the 8th Earl was murdered by James II and others at Stirling Castle.In 1455 the line of the Earls of Douglas was extinguished when the 9th Earl (1426–1488), James, fled to England and forfeited the estates. The Earls of Angus then became the principal line of the clan and they too became a powerful political force.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Elliot (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Elliot (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Elliot tartan is a bright blue with black banding and bright red accents.The Elliots appear as a clan with a chief in the Scottish Borders around the 15th century, with territory around Upper Liddesdale. They were notorious Border Reivers – families, from both England and Scotland, who raided the Border lands. The Elliots are said to be of Breton origin, coming to Britain with William the Conqueror’s invading army in 1066. Elliots – with many varied spellings of the name – settled all over the British Isles. They are based at Glenshee in Angus – Elliots gave their name to Elliot Water in Angus – but made a move to Teviotdale in the Borders around the time of Robert the Bruce.The principal family in the early 15th century was Elliot of Redheugh. In 1426, a John Elwalde of Teviotdale is recorded. In 1476, Robert Ellot of Redheugh appears as the 10th chief of the clan. Robert Ellot built a strong tower on a cliff overlooking the ford on Hermitage Water in Liddesdale in 1470. This was just one of about 100-strong towers around Liddesdale which belonged to the Ellots and which they shared with the Clan Armstrong, another Border Reiver clan. The Elliots of Stobs, also in the Borders, can be traced back to Gawain Elliot of Stobs in the late 16th century, who was descended from the Elliots of Redheugh. Elliot is an adapted version of the old English name Elwold. There is also a theory that it is derived from the name of an old Breton tribe, Halgoët, based on the Breton word for willow or saugh tree. The names Elwald, Elwalde and Ellot were common variations.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Ferguson tartan is a dark forest green with thin white and red accents.Ferguson means “son of Fergus”. In Gaelic, MacFhaerghuis, or the anglicised MacFergus, can also be translated as “son of the angry one”. There are Fergusons (or Fergussons) all over Scotland, and though it is not possible to ascribe one common ancestry to a patronymic name of this type, the clan’s history contains several stories of the origins of Fergusons in different areas of Scotland. There were branches of the clan all over Scotland, from Dumfriesshire through Argyll and Perthshire to Aberdeenshire and Ross-shire. These had separate chiefs, though the chief of the Fergussons of Kilkerran in Ayrshire has been recognised since the 18th century as the chief of all the Fergusons. The clan’s own history claims that the Fergusons of Strachur in Argyll can be traced back to Fergus Mór mac Eirc, who led his people, the “Scoti”, from Antrim in Ireland to settle in Argyll and establish the ancient tribal kingdom of Dalriada (Dál Riata), a Gaelic overkingdom that included parts of western Scotland and northeastern Ulster in Ireland in the 5th and 6th centuries.Records link the Fergusons of Dumfriesshire and Ayrshire with Fergus of Galloway (d. 1161) who was founder of Dundrennan Abbey. He was: father of Gilbert, or Gilla Brigte mac Fergusa, of Galloway (d. 1185); grandfather of Duncan, or Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick (d. 1250); and great-great-grandfather to Robert Bruce (1274–1329). This branch of the clan appears to have held estates in Kilkerran from medieval times, and they remain the principal clan family. Another important branch are the Fergusons of Dunfallandy in Atholl, who were recognised as the principal Highland family of the clan.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Grant Ancient HuntingWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Grant Ancient HuntingOur price: £9.99ViewThe Grant Ancient Hunting tartan is a cheerful combination of blues and greens, brightened by yellow and orange-red stripes which are bolstered by black undertones. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – HolyroodWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – HolyroodOur price: £9.99ViewThe Holyrood tartan is a blend of blues, greys and brown fretted with yellow.The Holyrood Tartan was created in 1977 to coincide with the celebration of the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Coronation (2nd June, 1953). The sett is based on Royal Stewart but with navy blue as the predominant colour, and overchecks of brown, light blue, green, gold and white. Holyrood is an area in Edinburgh, where Holyrood Palace (also called the Palace of Holyroodhouse), the ruins of Holyrood Abbey, Holyrood Park and the Scottish Parliament are situated. Holyrood Palace is the Queen’s official Scottish residence and it is located in the Canongate area at the foot of the Royal Mile, the street so named because it runs for one mile between Holyrood Palace and Edinburgh Castle. The site was originally of a monastery founded by King David I of Scotland in 1128. He chose this spot on which to build it because he is said to have seen a haily ruid (anglicised to holy rood), meaning holy cross, in the sky over this location. Here, many of the kings of Scotland were crowned, married or buried. The Palace itself was built in 1498, then severely damaged in 1544 by the Earl of Hertford’s troops and again a century later by Cromwell’s army and restored in the 1670s by Sir William Bruce on the orders of Charles II.The year of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee was marked by many celebrations, and Her Majesty made tours all over the British Isles and the Commonwealth to meet her subjects. Each year, the Queen hosts “Holyrood Week” – usually from the end of June to the beginning of July – to celebrate Scottish culture and achievements, and which includes a garden party at the Palace of Holyroodhouse.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with 80 gsm acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the Holyrood tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-434-0Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Holyrood (Large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Holyrood (Large)Our price: £14.99ViewAvailable from 1 June 2019Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacKay Ancient tartan is a blend of cool blues and greens interlaced with bands of black.This ancient clan, originally known as Clan Morgan and the Clan Aoidh, occupied lands in Durness, from the northwest peninsula of Cape Wrath, extending eastward to the border of Caithness and south to the northern edge of Sutherland. The MacKays are believed to be descendants of the Royal House of Moray, one of the seven Celtic earldoms. Iye Mac Eth (c. 1208–68), the progenitor of the clan, was Chamberlain to the Bishop of Caithness. His son, Iye Mór, acquired the Durness lands through marriage to the bishop’s daughter in 1263.In the 15th century Angus Dubh (d. 1433), the 7th chief, stood against Donald, Lord of the Isles, when the latter invaded Sutherland in his attempt to assert his claim to the Ross earldom. The invaders were victorious, and Angus was imprisoned until Donald’s defeat at the battle of Harlaw in 1411 forced a reconciliation. Angus later married Donald’s sister, Elizabeth, thereby acquiring further lands. In 1427 it was documented that Angus was the leader of a force of 4,000 men, a reflection of how much power he had accumulated.From the 16th century, the MacKays’ influence began to wane as their lands came under constant attack from the Gordon clan, who had acquired the earldom of Sutherland by force and sought to extend their territory. By the end of the century, the MacKay chief had become reduced to the status of vassal to the Gordon chief. The clan suffered in the 19th-century Highland Clearances and in 1829 the chief sold what remained of their lands to the house of Sutherland. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacPherson Red tartan is a warm blend of reds and blues which is crossed with black, green, bright yellow and white.The Scottish Gaelic for MacPherson, Mac a’ Phersein, means “son of the parson”. The Celtic church allowed priests to marry, and as an occupational name, you’ll find families with the name throughout Scotland. As a clan, the progenitor of the chiefs of Clan MacPherson is believed to have been a man named Muriach (or Muireach) Cattenach who was the parson of Kingussie in Badenoch. MacPhersons originated in Lochaber, though they were given lands in Badenoch – now the district of Badenoch and Strathspey in the Scottish Highlands – by Robert the Bruce as reward for defeating the Comyns (or Cummings) who were Bruce’s bitter enemies. MacPhersons are said to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan – which is a confederation of several clans – in the 12th century before that clan came under Mackintosh leadership. The Clan Chattan is sometimes referred to as the “Clan of the cats” because many of its constituent clans have a wild cat in their clan badge. The MacPherson clan motto is “Touch not the cat but a glove”, meaning “Don’t touch the cat without gloves”.The clan fought for Montrose in the Civil War (1642–49). They supported the Stuart cause during the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745.There is an annual Clan Gathering held at Newtonmore every August and there is also a Clan Museum in that town. The home of the current Chief, Sir William Alan MacPherson of Cluny and Blairgowrie, is Newton Castle, Blairgowrie.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the MacPherson Red tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-427-2Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Murray of Atholl Ancient tartan is soft blend of black, blue and green, with contrasting red lines. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Murray of Atholl Ancient tartan is soft blend of black, blue and green, with contrasting red lines.It is said that the Murrays are descended from Freskin, a Pictish noble who lived in the time of David I (12th century). Freskin’s grandson William assumed the designation of “de Moravia” reflecting his ownership of land in the area of Moray. The Murrays of Tullibardine, progenitors of the Dukes of Atholl and the chiefs of the Clan Murray of Atholl, are descended from one of William de Moravia’s sons.John Murray (1608–1642) was the son of William, 2nd Earl of Tullibardine (c. 1574–1626) and Dorothea Stewart (heir of the 5th Earl of Atholl). John Murray was created Earl of Atholl in the Peerage of Scotland in 1629. He was the 1st Earl of Atholl with the surname Murray.John Murray, the 2nd Marquess of Atholl (1660–1724) became 1st Duke of Atholl in 1703. The Duke of Atholl is the hereditary chief of Clan Murray. The Duke gathered 4,000 men in an attempt to oppose the Union of 1707. He did not support the Jacobite Rebellions, but his elder son William Murray, Marquess of Tullibardine (1689–1746) and his younger son Lord George Murray (1694–1760) fought for Charles Edward Stuart in the Jacobite army. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Black Watch tartan is a rich, dark green and blue laced with black .The Black Watch was formed in the wake of the unsuccessful 1715 Jacobite Rebellion, where James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1766), son of the deposed James II, fought to put the exiled House of Stuart back on the throne. From 1725, General George Wade (1673–1748) formed six military companies from the clans of the Campbells, Grants, Frasers and Munros. They were stationed in small detachments across the Highlands to prevent fighting among the clans, deter raiding, and to assist in enforcing laws against the carrying of weapons. In short, they were tasked with protecting the interests of the Hanoverian throne in Scotland. Wade issued an order in May 1725, for the companies all to wear plaid of the same sort and colour. Their original uniform was made from a 12-yard long plaid of the tartan that we know now as the Black Watch tartan. They wore a scarlet jacket and waistcoat, with the tartan cloth worn over the left shoulder. The name is said to come from the dark tartan they wore, hence “black”, and from the fact that they were policing the land, hence “watch”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Elliot (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Elliot (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Elliot tartan is a bright blue with black banding and bright red accents.The Elliots appear as a clan with a chief in the Scottish Borders around the 15th century, with territory around Upper Liddesdale. They were notorious Border Reivers – families, from both England and Scotland, who raided the Border lands. The Elliots are said to be of Breton origin, coming to Britain with William the Conqueror’s invading army in 1066. Elliots – with many varied spellings of the name – settled all over the British Isles. They are based at Glenshee in Angus – Elliots gave their name to Elliot Water in Angus – but made a move to Teviotdale in the Borders around the time of Robert the Bruce.The principal family in the early 15th century was Elliot of Redheugh. In 1426, a John Elwalde of Teviotdale is recorded. In 1476, Robert Ellot of Redheugh appears as the 10th chief of the clan. Robert Ellot built a strong tower on a cliff overlooking the ford on Hermitage Water in Liddesdale in 1470. This was just one of about 100-strong towers around Liddesdale which belonged to the Ellots and which they shared with the Clan Armstrong, another Border Reiver clan. The Elliots of Stobs, also in the Borders, can be traced back to Gawain Elliot of Stobs in the late 16th century, who was descended from the Elliots of Redheugh. Elliot is an adapted version of the old English name Elwold. There is also a theory that it is derived from the name of an old Breton tribe, Halgoët, based on the Breton word for willow or saugh tree. The names Elwald, Elwalde and Ellot were common variations.
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