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Waverley Scotland Pocket Format Clan Tartan Commonplace Notebooks

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Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (pocket size)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Anderson (pocket size)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Anderson tartan’s predominant colour is a cool mid blue, and is crossed with red, yellow, black and white.The names Anderson and MacAndrew are connected with St Andrew. The popularity of the first name Andrew and the associated patronymic surnames meaning “son of Andrew” – with MacAndrew used in the Highlands, and Anderson in the Lowlands – means their use is very widespread, and so no exact origin of the names has been established. Gillanders, the Scottish Gaelic form, has the meaning “servant of Andrew”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Black Watch (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Black Watch (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Black Watch tartan is a rich, dark green and blue laced with black.The Black Watch was formed in the wake of the unsuccessful 1715 Jacobite Rebellion, where James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1766), son of the deposed James II, fought to put the exiled House of Stuart back on the throne. From 1725, General George Wade (1673–1748) formed six military companies from the clans of the Campbells, Grants, Frasers and Munros. They were stationed in small detachments across the Highlands to prevent fighting among the clans, deter raiding, and to assist in enforcing laws against the carrying of weapons. In short, they were tasked with protecting the interests of the Hanoverian throne in Scotland. Wade issued an order in May 1725, for the companies all to wear plaid of the same sort and colour. Their original uniform was made from a 12-yard long plaid of the tartan that we know now as the Black Watch tartan. They wore a scarlet jacket and waistcoat, with the tartan cloth worn over the left shoulder. The name is said to come from the dark tartan they wore, hence “black”, and from the fact that they were policing the land, hence “watch”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Buchanan Reproduction (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Buchanan Reproduction (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewA6 notebook, A6 journalThe Buchanan Reproduction tartan has a warm palette of reds, browns, golds and greens.It is claimed by the Clan Buchanan that it can trace its line back to a son of one of the kings of Ulster, Anselan O Kyan, who came to Argyll in 1016. He fought for King Malcolm II against the Danes and, as reward, was given the lands of Buchanan, to the east of Loch Lomond near Killearn in Stirlingshire. Two Gaelic names are given as the root of the placename Buchanan, Mac a Chanonaich (“the son of the canon”) and Buth Chanain (meaning “house or seat of the canon”).In 1225 another Anselan, recorded as Absalom of Buchanan, was granted lands in Buchanan by Maldouen, Earl of Lennox (d. 1250). And in 1231, King Alexander II (1214–49) made a charter awarding other lands in Buchanan to Gilbert, Seneschal (an administrative officer in the houses of important nobles) of the Earl of Lennox. The Buchanans supported King Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Independence. They fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. The clan prospered in the time of David II in the 14th century, however, towards the end of the 17th century the house and lands of Buchanan were sold to the Marquess of Montrose, Chief of Clan Graham.Reproduction tartans are also sometimes called “weathered” or “muted”. The tartan itself is identical to the tartan of that clan name, but the colours are “muted” because they have been reproduced to match pieces of cloth, found in homesteads and battlefields, that have been weathered by exposure to the Scottish climate.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Caledonia (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Caledonia (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe vibrant Caledonia tartan has a sea-green background overlaid with broad red banding, with accents of black, white and yellow.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Cameron of ErrachtWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Cameron of ErrachtOur price: £9.99ViewThe Cameron of Erracht tartan has a lively palette of green, red and yellow interspersed with black and dark blue.The Cameron of Erracht tartan, a blend of the MacDonald and Cameron tartans, was designed in 1793 for the regiment of the 79th or Cameron Highlanders. The Cameron of Erracht clan is a branch of Clan Cameron, a West Highland Scottish clan. The Camerons, were among the strongest of the Highland clans with a reputation for bravery, and they commanded the “Road to the Isles” (an area from Corpach in the Highlands, towards the Western Isles).Donald Cameron, 7th of Erracht, was born shortly before the Jacobite Rising of 1715. He fought for Charles Edward Stuart (“Bonnie Prince Charlie”) in the Jacobite Rising of 1745, and, under Cameron of Lochiel, was second in command of the Camerons at Glenfinnan in Lochaber where the rebellion began.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Campbell AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Campbell AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Campbell Ancient tartan’s palette is restful blues and greens overset with bands of black.Clan Campbell was the most powerful clan in the southern Highlands of Scotland. Tradition has it that the clan is descended from Diarmid – a Celtic mythological hero – hence the reason why they are known as the “Race of Diarmid”. Historically, their ancestors were almost certainly of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada (or Dál Riata) and were probably a family of high rank. Their name in Gaelic is Caimbuel – which translates as “wry or crooked mouth”.In common with many of the Scottish clans, the Campbells were keen to extend their territories and their power. The degree to which they achieved this aim was due, in part, to their willingness to cooperate with the Lowland Scotland power base.At the height of their power they held extensive lands throughout Argyll, in Perthshire, Ayrshire, Inverness-shire and on the islands of Mull and Islay. With the Lords of the Isles disempowered and dispossessed by James IV, the authority of the Campbell chief in the southern Highlands became almost regal. The powerful clan chiefs inspired both loyalty and courage in their kinsmen and in the mid-18th century it was estimated that the Campbell strength stood at 5,000 men.The principal branch of the clan is that of Argyll, which was created a dukedom in 1701. Other important branches are those of Cawdor, Breadalbane and Loudoun which have their own tartans. The Campbell Ancient tartan has the same sett as the Black Watch – raised by the Duke of Argyll in 1739 and served by members of the clan – but it uses lighter shades of blue and green.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Colquhoun AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Colquhoun AncientOur price: £9.99View The Colquhoun Ancient tartan is green blended with blue and black, bearing thin white and red stripes. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Davidson AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Davidson AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Davidson Ancient tartan is a bright blue and green with black overlaid and a cheerful single orange stripe.The Davidsons appear to have been a Gaelic-speaking clan who lived on lands in Badenoch (a historic area in Strathspey in the Highlands). In the early part of the 14th century, the Davidsons became part of the Clan Chattan confederation, an alliance of clans that included the MacPhersons, Mackintoshes, MacGillivrays and MacBeans. The first chief, David Dubh, was the son of Donald Dubh, a Comyn, and Slane, daughter of the sixth Mackintosh chief. Thereafter the clan became known as Clan Dhai.The Davidsons appear to have been virtually destroyed by clan conflict in the late 14th century. One account concerns the battle of Invernahaven in 1370, when the Camerons marched on the Mackintoshes in a dispute over land rent. As the rival clans prepared for combat, the Mackintoshes had the support of other families in the Clan Chattan confederation, including the Davidsons and the MacPhersons. However, a disagreement arose between these two clans over the command in battle and the MacPhersons left the field feeling they had been dishonoured. In the ensuing confusion the Camerons attacked the Davidsons who, it is said, suffered almost complete annihilation.Another account cites a clan battle in 1396 on the North Inch at Perth that was fought in front of King Robert III. The Davidsons fought as part of the Clan Chattan forces against the Camerons. Soon after this battle it seems that the Davidsons moved to Tulloch, the area with which the family is principally associated, and over the centuries the name appears in other parts of Scotland, including the Borders. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Douglas AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Douglas AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Douglas Ancient tartan is composed of blue and green with a narrow band of black and a thin white stripe.There are many legends of the origin of this powerful family but, remarkably, a definitive account has never been established. It is believed that the name was derived from Douglas Water in Lanarkshire, and the first record of the name appears in the late 12th century.Sir William Douglas, “le Hardi” (c. 1243c. 1298), was governor of the Borders town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, when it was besieged by the English. Douglas was taken prisoner and forced to swear loyalty to the English king, Edward I, although he later fought alongside William Wallace for the independence of Scotland. Berwick-upon-Tweed was founded in Saxon times and has changed hands many times between Scotland and England. (Today Berwick-upon-Tweed is in Northumberland, England, and is still only three miles from the Scottish border...)His son, the “Good Sir James” or “The Black Douglas” (c. 1286–1330), was a close companion to Robert the Bruce, and he fulfilled his king’s dying wish by carrying Robert’s heart into battle against the Moors in Spain, where he himself was killed.The fortunes of the Douglas family increased with the marriage of James, 2nd Earl of Douglas (c. 1358–1388), to a princess of the Royal House of Stewart. By the middle of the 15th century they had accumulated so much power that they were regarded as a danger to the stability of the nation. In 1440 the 6th Earl was executed after being lured to Edinburgh Castle by an invitation to dine with the young King James II. In 1452 the 8th Earl was murdered by James II and others at Stirling Castle.In 1455 the line of the Earls of Douglas was extinguished when the 9th Earl (1426–1488), James, fled to England and forfeited the estates. The Earls of Angus then became the principal line of the clan and they too became a powerful political force.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Dress GordonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Dress GordonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Dress Gordon tartan’s dark greens, blues and blacks are brightened by wide flashes of white and yellow accents.The first record of the Gordons places them in the Lowlands and suggests that they were of Anglo-Norman origin. The Highland clan is claimed to be descended from Sir Adam Gordon (d. 1333), a supporter of King Robert the Bruce, who received the lands of Strathbogie in return for his services to the king. The family built Huntly Castle on these lands at the beginning of the 15th century.Although the senior male line ended in 1402, the marriage of Elizabeth Gordon (d. 1439) to Alexander of the influential Seton family consolidated their powerful position in the Highlands.They further profited from the authority given to them by the Stewart kings and gained other lands and titles, including those of Sutherland. This inspired the sobriquet “Cock o’ the North”, a nickname affectionately given to the Chief of the Gordons. They did come into conflict with the Scottish Crown when George Gordon, the 4th Earl of Huntly (1514–1562) contested the earldoms of Mar and Moray bestowed by Mary, Queen of Scots on her half-brother James Stewart (c. 1531–1570). In October 1562, the Gordons were defeated by a royal army at the Battle of Corrichie in Aberdeenshire. Earl Huntly died during the fray and his body was later taken to Edinburgh where it was publicly disgraced. However, the 5th Earl (d. 1576) made peace with Mary and became her Chancellor in 1565.The Gordons of Haddo acquired their lands in the northeast in the 15th century. Haddo House, a fine example of Palladian architecture (inspired by the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio) by William Adam (1689–1748), was built for them in the 17th century. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Dress MackenzieWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Dress MackenzieOur price: £9.99ViewThe Dress Mackenzie tartan contrasts wide bands of snowy white with dark blacks, blues and greens – and a single vibrant red stripe.The Mackenzie clan is of Celtic origin, and its history goes back to at least the 13th century when they were established at Eilean Donan, near Kyle of Lochalsh, in the western Highlands of Scotland which was to be their stronghold for centuries.In the 15th century, at a time when many of the Gaelic clans were asserting their independence of the monarchy, Alexander, 6th of Kintail, and 1st Chief Mackenzie (before 1436, after 1471), gave his allegiance to the Royal House of Stewart. Alexander’s loyalty to James III against John of Islay, 4th Lord of the Isles (chief of Clan Donald, d. 1423) was rewarded with a royal charter to the lands at Kintail and later with the award of lands that had been confiscated from the MacDonalds.Through successive chiefs, the Mackenzies continued to pledge their allegiance to the Crown, and by the beginning of the 17th century they had acquired the forfeited lands of the MacLeods in Lewis and the MacDonnels in Lochalsh. In 1609, Kenneth, 12th Chief of Kintail, was created Lord Mackenzie, and his son, Colin, was created the 1st Earl of Seaforth 14 years later.The Mackenzies installed the Macraes as hereditary governors of Eilean Donan Castle, and the loyalty of the Macraes to their overlords was such that they were known as the “Mackenzies’ shirt of mail”.The fortunes of the clan wavered in the 18th century when their support of the failed 1715 Jacobite Rebellion resulted in the forfeit of their lands and titles. The lands were repurchased and the title of Earl of Seaforth restored in 1771, but the male line died out in 1815.The Mackenzie motto is Luceo non uro – “shine not burn”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Elliot (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Elliot (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Elliot tartan is a bright blue with black banding and bright red accents.The Elliots appear as a clan with a chief in the Scottish Borders around the 15th century, with territory around Upper Liddesdale. They were notorious Border Reivers – families, from both England and Scotland, who raided the Border lands. The Elliots are said to be of Breton origin, coming to Britain with William the Conqueror’s invading army in 1066. Elliots – with many varied spellings of the name – settled all over the British Isles. They are based at Glenshee in Angus – Elliots gave their name to Elliot Water in Angus – but made a move to Teviotdale in the Borders around the time of Robert the Bruce.The principal family in the early 15th century was Elliot of Redheugh. In 1426, a John Elwalde of Teviotdale is recorded. In 1476, Robert Ellot of Redheugh appears as the 10th chief of the clan. Robert Ellot built a strong tower on a cliff overlooking the ford on Hermitage Water in Liddesdale in 1470. This was just one of about 100-strong towers around Liddesdale which belonged to the Ellots and which they shared with the Clan Armstrong, another Border Reiver clan. The Elliots of Stobs, also in the Borders, can be traced back to Gawain Elliot of Stobs in the late 16th century, who was descended from the Elliots of Redheugh. Elliot is an adapted version of the old English name Elwold. There is also a theory that it is derived from the name of an old Breton tribe, Halgoët, based on the Breton word for willow or saugh tree. The names Elwald, Elwalde and Ellot were common variations.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – FergusonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Ferguson tartan is a dark forest green with thin white and red accents.Ferguson means “son of Fergus”. In Gaelic, MacFhaerghuis, or the anglicised MacFergus, can also be translated as “son of the angry one”. There are Fergusons (or Fergussons) all over Scotland, and though it is not possible to ascribe one common ancestry to a patronymic name of this type, the clan’s history contains several stories of the origins of Fergusons in different areas of Scotland. There were branches of the clan all over Scotland, from Dumfriesshire through Argyll and Perthshire to Aberdeenshire and Ross-shire. These had separate chiefs, though the chief of the Fergussons of Kilkerran in Ayrshire has been recognised since the 18th century as the chief of all the Fergusons. The clan’s own history claims that the Fergusons of Strachur in Argyll can be traced back to Fergus Mór mac Eirc, who led his people, the “Scoti”, from Antrim in Ireland to settle in Argyll and establish the ancient tribal kingdom of Dalriada (Dál Riata), a Gaelic overkingdom that included parts of western Scotland and northeastern Ulster in Ireland in the 5th and 6th centuries.Records link the Fergusons of Dumfriesshire and Ayrshire with Fergus of Galloway (d. 1161) who was founder of Dundrennan Abbey. He was: father of Gilbert, or Gilla Brigte mac Fergusa, of Galloway (d. 1185); grandfather of Duncan, or Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick (d. 1250); and great-great-grandfather to Robert Bruce (1274–1329). This branch of the clan appears to have held estates in Kilkerran from medieval times, and they remain the principal clan family. Another important branch are the Fergusons of Dunfallandy in Atholl, who were recognised as the principal Highland family of the clan.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Gordon Red WeatheredWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Gordon Red WeatheredOur price: £9.99ViewThe Gordon Red Weathered tartan blends slate greys and earthy browns with a vibrant red banding and slim white highlights.The first record of this very old Scottish clan name is from the 12th century, that of Richard, Lord of the Barony of Gordon in the Merse, which was part of what we now know as Berwickshire. However, since then, the clan’s association has been with lands in Aberdeenshire.It is said that the progenitor of the Gordon clan is Richard’s descendant Sir Adam Gordon (d. 1333). During the wars of independence, he backed William Wallace in 1297 and, after renouncing his support of Edward I, also supported Robert the Bruce. In 1320, Gordon and Sir Edward Mabinson were bearers of three letters to the Pope asserting the independence of the Kingdom of Scotland, dated at Aberbrothock (Arbroath) on the 6th of April. One of these letters was the famous Declaration of Arbroath, signed and sealed by 51 nobles. It failed to convince the pope to lift his excommunication of Scotland but it is an eloquent and influential expression of nationhood. Bruce granted Gordon the lordship of Strathbogie in Aberdeenshire, which was then renamed Huntly, after a village on Gordon’s Berwickshire estate. Gordon was killed during the Battle of Halidon Hill (1333). The Gordon Red tartan is sometimes referred to as “the Huntly tartan”. The Gordon Red Weathered tartan is a design that is intended to emulate the colours of an antique and original remnant of Gordon Red tartan fabric. The muted colours are replicated using natural dyes, and are intended to look faded with age. As their name suggests, weathered tartans are lighter in tone. The end result is a more natural and authentic look to the colourway of the tartan. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Grant Ancient HuntingWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Grant Ancient HuntingOur price: £9.99ViewThe Grant Ancient Hunting tartan is a cheerful combination of blues and greens, brightened by yellow and orange-red stripes which are bolstered by black undertones. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hamilton RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hamilton RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe Hamilton Red tartan displays an even mix of bright red and blue with a subtle white accent.The House of Hamilton is a lowland Scottish family with auspicious connections. Numerous members throughout history have held high office, titles and substantial territories thoughout Scotland. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hay AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Hay AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe Hay Ancient tartan is predominantly red with muted greens and accents of white, black and yellow.The Hays are of Norman descent; the name being derived from the barony of La Haye du Puits. The history of the Hays in Scotland begins with William de Haya who was a cup-bearer at the court of Malcolm IV in 1160. It is believed that de Haya was descended from one of the Norman princes who travelled to England with William the Conqueror. In 1178 it was either he or his son, another William, who was granted the lands of Errol in Perthshire by King William the Lion. William de Haya married a Celtic heiress called Eva of Pitmilly. The northeast of Scotland is Hay country, however, the family are also to be found in Perthshire, the Scottish Borders and Shetland. The Gaelic form of the name is MacGaradh. Sir Gilbert Hay, fifth Lord of Errol, was a companion-in-arms to Robert the Bruce and was rewarded with lands at Slains in Aberdeenshire and the office of Lord High Constable of Scotland. Since 1314, this title has been hereditary and all the chiefs of the clan have enjoyed a rank second only to the monarchy in Scotland. The Hays retained a close bond with their native France. Sir Gilbert Hay, ancestor of the Hays of Delgatie, fought for Joan of Arc in the 15th century, and 150 years later the Hays formed part of the Catholic forces that defeated the government army at Glenlivet. Slains Castle, the seat of the earls of Errol, was destroyed by James VI in retaliation. The Hays were staunch supporters of the Jacobite cause, and in the uprising of 1746 the ruins of Slains Castle became a focus of Jacobite intrigues. Today these ruins can still be seen, while the castle later built by the Hays, also called Slains, is said to have inspired the castle in Bram Stoker’s Dracula.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – HolyroodWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – HolyroodOur price: £9.99ViewThe Holyrood tartan is a blend of blues, greys and brown fretted with yellow.The Holyrood Tartan was created in 1977 to coincide with the celebration of the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Coronation (2nd June, 1953). The sett is based on Royal Stewart but with navy blue as the predominant colour, and overchecks of brown, light blue, green, gold and white. Holyrood is an area in Edinburgh, where Holyrood Palace (also called the Palace of Holyroodhouse), the ruins of Holyrood Abbey, Holyrood Park and the Scottish Parliament are situated. Holyrood Palace is the Queen’s official Scottish residence and it is located in the Canongate area at the foot of the Royal Mile, the street so named because it runs for one mile between Holyrood Palace and Edinburgh Castle. The site was originally of a monastery founded by King David I of Scotland in 1128. He chose this spot on which to build it because he is said to have seen a haily ruid (anglicised to holy rood), meaning holy cross, in the sky over this location. Here, many of the kings of Scotland were crowned, married or buried. The Palace itself was built in 1498, then severely damaged in 1544 by the Earl of Hertford’s troops and again a century later by Cromwell’s army and restored in the 1670s by Sir William Bruce on the orders of Charles II.The year of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee was marked by many celebrations, and Her Majesty made tours all over the British Isles and the Commonwealth to meet her subjects. Each year, the Queen hosts “Holyrood Week” – usually from the end of June to the beginning of July – to celebrate Scottish culture and achievements, and which includes a garden party at the Palace of Holyroodhouse.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the Holyrood tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-434-0Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Isle of Skye (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Isle of Skye (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Isle of Skye tartan blends rich, heathery purples with shades of misty and mossy greens.The Isle of Skye, long celebrated for its beauty in poetry and song, is situated off the west coast of Scotland, connected to the mainland by a bridge. The island’s largest town is Portree, famous for the brightly coloured houses in its harbour.Skye’s history includes a period of Norse rule and domination by Clan MacLeod and Clan Donald. It suffered particularly in the 18th-century following the Jacobite Risings, and with the breaking up of the clan system, and following the Highland Clearances that led entire communities to have to leave their land – some via forced emigrations. After the failed Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, Flora MacDonald helped to rescue Prince Charles Edward Stuart from the Hanoverian troops, disguising him and taking him to Skye to hide.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Kinloch AndersonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Kinloch AndersonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Kinloch Anderson tartan is a rich combination of earthy browns, greens and golds, with a bold vein of dark red.Kinloch Anderson was founded in 1868 when William Anderson, a tailor and maker of fine clothing, opened his first prestigious shop in George Street, Edinburgh. From modest beginnings, the company has achieved a unique place in the Scottish textile and fashion industry, managed by the sixth generation of the family. For a century-and-a-half, Kinloch Anderson has been instrumental in maintaining the status of Highland dress. In the 20th century, the company developed an expertise in military tailoring and made officers’ uniforms for all the Scottish regiments. Kinloch Anderson is now a worldwide lifestyle heritage brand identifying itself as “British Style – Scottish Character”. There has been a long and unbroken tradition of supplying the British Royal Family, beginning with King Edward VII in 1903. The company is proud to have Royal Warrants of Appointment as tailors and kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and HRH The Prince of Wales.Deirdre Kinloch Anderson, a director of the company, was the leading architect of the official Scottish Register of Tartans. Until 2009, the recording of tartans was carried out by private organisations. Deirdre led the project to ensure that the recording and codification of tartans was placed in the public domain, safeguarding Scotland’s tartan heritage in perpetuity. It took seven years and a Private Member’s Bill to enable the establishment of the register, held within the National Archives of Scotland.Kinloch Anderson has created its own exclusive range of tartans, available to all, which includes the design pictured above – the Kinloch Anderson Tartan.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the Kinloch Anderson tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-410-4Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – LindsayWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – LindsayOur price: £9.99ViewThe Lindsay tartan is made up of a deep burgundy and navy with a subtle green overlaid.It is thought the name Lindsay is taken from the area of Lincoln in east England, and Lindsay was one of the lesser kingdoms around 450ad. The name is recorded also for a Norman, Baldric de Lindsay. Sir Walter de Lindesey was one of many Norman knights who accompanied King David I on his return to Scotland in 1124.Two generations later, the Lindsays held lands at Crawford in Lanarkshire. Through marriage of another Sir William Lindsay to a Northumbrian heiress, they gained great wealth. Sir William’s son David (d. 1214) married into the Scottish Royal Family, and another Sir David, became Lord High Chamberlain in 1256. The Lindsays supported William Wallace and Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Independence, and Sir David Lindsay, Lord of Crawford, was one of the nobles who signed the 1320 Declaration of Arbroath, the document sent to the Pope that asserted Scotland’s independence. Another Sir David Lindsay, who became the 1st Earl of Crawford in 1398, was particularly distinguished. In 1390 he fought before Richard II of England in a famous tournament on London Bridge where his skill and courage earned him the admiration of the English king. Sir David Lindsay of the Mount, in Fife was an attendant of James V and served as Lord Lyon, King of Arms but is best remembered as the author of Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis, a play that satirises the corruption within the Church and the State. First performed in 1540, it gained the royal approval of James V and is still performed today. Edzell Castle near Brechin, seat of the Earls of Crawford, although now a ruin, is renowned for its beautiful garden and summer house.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacBethWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacBethOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacBeth tartan is a very colourful balance of reds, blues and greens with white and yellow highlights.Most of us are familiar with the name MacBeth, or Macbeth, through Shakespeare’s play of that name. In Scottish history it is said that King Macbeth, Mac Bethad mac Findláich (c.1005–57) was the grandson of King Malcolm II, and his wife (Gruoch) was the granddaughter of King Kenneth III. The real king bore little resemblance to Shakespeare’s creation, though he did kill the ruling king, Duncan I, in battle, and he was killed by Malcolm Canmore (later Malcolm III) in 1056.But, surprisingly, the surname MacBeth is not related to him. The surname has the look of a patronymic name (“son of ...”) but it is not. Mac Bethad (or, in modern Gaelic, MacBheatha), means “son of life”. The surname MacBeth is associated with a family of hereditary physicians, thought to have originated in Ireland, who practised medicine for the Lords of the Isles. They were employed by every Scottish monarch between Robert I (d. 1329) and Charles I (d. 1649). Some changed their name to Beaton. Some migrated to the west coast and Mull. Others went to Inverness, Sutherland, Easter Ross and Moray. The MacBeths/Beatons are sometimes called the “Beaton Medical Kindred”, and they are listed as a sept of the clans MacBean and Maclean. The MacBeth tartan in which this notebook is bound is based on the Royal Stewart sett.There is another Beaton family, with an ancestral line originating in Fife and Angus, but their name is derived from the French placename Béthune. They are not related to the Irish MacBeth/Beatons but, confusingly, they also practised medicine. The Bethunes have their own crest and tartan (designed in 1997 by Phil Smith) but they are listed as a sept of clans MacLeod and MacDonald. About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the MacBeth tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-435-7Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDonaldWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDonaldOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacDonald tartan bears a lattice of bright red over a dark background of blue and green.If your surname is MacDonald then you belong to the Clan Donald. There are several branches of the clan with origins all around the Highlands of Scotland: including Islay, Glen Garry near Fort William, Lochaber, Glen Coe in the north of Argyll, and Ardnamurchan on the west coast. The branches of Clan Donald were determined by the different lands granted to the descendants of Donald of Islay. Their main stronghold was Loch Finlaggan on Islay where they held their court.The Clan Donald is the largest of the Highland Clans and is often described as the most powerful. The Clan Donald was descended from Donald, grandson of the heroic Somerled, Lord of the Isles (d. 1164). Donald’s grandson, Angus Og (d. 1330), was granted vast lands in the Highlands and Western Isles by Robert the Bruce, whom he had supported in the fight for Scottish independence.Angus had two sons, one of whom, John, became Lord of the Isles (d. 1386), while the other, Iain (d. 1368), was the progenitor of the MacDonalds of Glencoe. The name MacDonald is, of course, at the centre of one of the most famous stories in Scottish history, the Massacre of Glencoe of 1692, in which 38 clan members were slaughtered by a Highland regiment under the command of Robert Campbell of Glenlyon (1630–96), on the orders of John Dalrymple, Secretary of State for Scotland (1648–1707).There are at least 27 different tartan setts associated with the Clan Donald. Their motto is Per mare per terras, “by sea and by land”. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDuff Modern HuntingWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacDuff Modern HuntingOur price: £9.99ViewThe Macduff Modern Hunting tartan’s blue glows out against a background of dark browns and hints of green, shot through with bold reds.Before the clan system was fully recognised, the MacDuff Earls of Fife were the greatest family in Scotland. MacDuff, 1st Earl of Fife, was held to be the Earl of Fife who opposed Macbeth (1040–1057) and assisted Malcolm to the throne of Scotland. The centre of MacDuff power was the kingdom of Fife, and they held extensive lands in the northeast and in the Lowlands. The MacDuffs held the ancient privilege of crowning the kings of Scotland on the ancient Stone of Scone, the right to bear the red lion rampant of the royal house, and the right to lead the front rank of the Scottish army. They could also claim the right of reprieve for the crime of murder, for a modest payment, or the right of sanctuary at the Cross of MacDuff near Newburgh, Fife.Clan Duff claims to be of the original Royal Scoto-Pictish line. The line ended in 1353 with the death of Duncan IV, and the Earldom of Fife was passed to the House of Stewart in 1371. In 1759 the earldom of Fife returned to the Duff family when William Duff, Lord Braco (1697–1763) received the title Earl Fife in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1733 he bought a settlement called Doune on the Moray Firth that in 1783 became known as MacDuff. He bought Duff House, Banff (designed by William Adam) though he never lived in it. His son James, 2nd Earl Fife (1729–1809) completed the building of the house. In the 1817, James, 4th Earl Fife (1776–1857), renamed the town of Mortlach in Moray as Dufftown.The MacDuff tartan, above, is the “hunting” version of their clan tartan, modern colours. Hunting tartans replace the most prominent colour in the main tartan with darker colours like green and blue.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacGregorOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacGregor tartan is an intense red with broad bands of blacks and a single white highlight.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacKay AncientOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacKay Ancient tartan is a blend of cool blues and greens interlaced with bands of black.This ancient clan, originally known as Clan Morgan and the Clan Aoidh, occupied lands in Durness, from the northwest peninsula of Cape Wrath, extending eastward to the border of Caithness and south to the northern edge of Sutherland. The MacKays are believed to be descendants of the Royal House of Moray, one of the seven Celtic earldoms. Iye Mac Eth (c. 1208–68), the progenitor of the clan, was Chamberlain to the Bishop of Caithness. His son, Iye Mór, acquired the Durness lands through marriage to the bishop’s daughter in 1263.In the 15th century Angus Dubh (d. 1433), the 7th chief, stood against Donald, Lord of the Isles, when the latter invaded Sutherland in his attempt to assert his claim to the Ross earldom. The invaders were victorious, and Angus was imprisoned until Donald’s defeat at the battle of Harlaw in 1411 forced a reconciliation. Angus later married Donald’s sister, Elizabeth, thereby acquiring further lands. In 1427 it was documented that Angus was the leader of a force of 4,000 men, a reflection of how much power he had accumulated.From the 16th century, the MacKays’ influence began to wane as their lands came under constant attack from the Gordon clan, who had acquired the earldom of Sutherland by force and sought to extend their territory. By the end of the century, the MacKay chief had become reduced to the status of vassal to the Gordon chief. The clan suffered in the 19th-century Highland Clearances and in 1829 the chief sold what remained of their lands to the house of Sutherland. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Maclean of Duart (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Maclean of Duart (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Maclean of Duart tartan is a rich blend of reds and dark green fretted with pale blue, yellow and white.The Macleans claim descent from Gillean of the Battleaxe, a kinsman of Fergus Mor, the sixth-century ruler of the ancient kingdom of Dalriada. The progenitor of the clan was Lachlan Lubanach who lived in the late 14th century. Lachlan was married to the daughter of the 1st Lord of the Isles and from him received lands in Mull. Mull is an island located off the west coast of Scotland. Lachlan is recorded as being the first Maclean to occupy Duart Castle, the ancient stronghold of the Maclean chiefs. At the end of the 15th century, James IV (1473–1513) successfully challenged the power and independence of the Gaelic clans, and in 1493 Lachlan Maclean was stripped of his lands and titles. The Macleans, who had supported the monarch, received royal confirmation of their possessions and titles, which now included lands in Tiree, Jura, Islay, Morvern and Lochaber.During the 16th century the Campbells emerged as the most powerful clan in the West Highlands. Several marriages took place between the Macleans and the Campbells, but the match between Lachlan Maclean and the daughter of the 2nd Earl of Argyll proved disastrous. Lachlan despised his wife so much that he marooned her on a rock in the Sound of Mull and left her to drown, before reporting her death to her family. However, the lady was rescued by fishermen and returned to her clan, and her brother stabbed Lachlan to death in revenge for his cruelty.Duart Castle fell to the Hanoverians during the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion and was unoccupied until 1911, when it was repurchased and renovated by the clan chief.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Macleod of LewisOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacLeod of Lewis tartan has a bright yellow background crossed with blacks, embellished with a filament of red.The MacLeods are Norse, descended from Leod, the son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann and the Isles. Leod’s sons were the progenitors of two main branches of the clan – the Clan of Torquil in Lewis and the Clan of Tormod in Skye and Harris.The MacLeods were vassals (subjects) of the Lords of the Isles but managed to avoid forfeiture of their lands after James IV had asserted his right over the Gaelic clans of the Hebrides. However, they were forced to defend their possessions with the sword against the interests of rival clans.Alasdair, 8th Chief of Harris (1450–1547), was one of the most distinguished of the MacLeod chiefs. In 1542 he obtained a charter for the lands of Trotternish on Skye, which had been the cause of a long feud between the MacDonalds and the MacLeods. He also built St Clements Church at Rodel in Harris and the Fairy Tower at Dunvegan Castle on Skye, the ancient seat of the MacLeod chief.While the principal branch of the family prospered under Alasdair, the line of Torquil was less fortunate. At the beginning of the 16th century the MacLeod lands in Lewis, and those acquired through marriage at Assynt in Sutherland, were forfeited after the MacLeod chief supported Donald Dubh in his attempt to claim the Lordship of the Isles. Although the lands were restored a few years later, the clan was weakened by internal disputes at the beginning of the 17th century and their lands passed to the Mackenzies through marriage. The MacLeod of Lewis tartan is one of the most recognisable designs, first depicted in a portrait dating from around 1830.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacMillan Modern BlackWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacMillan Modern BlackOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacMillan Modern Black tartan has plummy reds and blacks crossed with broad gold bands, and thin stripes of forest green. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacPherson RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe MacPherson Red tartan is a warm blend of reds and blues which is crossed with black, green, bright yellow and white.The Scottish Gaelic for MacPherson, Mac a’ Phersein, means “son of the parson”. The Celtic church allowed priests to marry, and as an occupational name, you’ll find families with the name throughout Scotland. As a clan, the progenitor of the chiefs of Clan MacPherson is believed to have been a man named Muriach (or Muireach) Cattenach who was the parson of Kingussie in Badenoch. MacPhersons originated in Lochaber, though they were given lands in Badenoch – now the district of Badenoch and Strathspey in the Scottish Highlands – by Robert the Bruce as reward for defeating the Comyns (or Cummings) who were Bruce’s bitter enemies. MacPhersons are said to have been the early chiefs of Clan Chattan – which is a confederation of several clans – in the 12th century before that clan came under Mackintosh leadership. The Clan Chattan is sometimes referred to as the “Clan of the cats” because many of its constituent clans have a wild cat in their clan badge. The MacPherson clan motto is “Touch not the cat but a glove”, meaning “Don’t touch the cat without gloves”.The clan fought for Montrose in the Civil War (1642–49). They supported the Stuart cause during the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745.There is an annual Clan Gathering held at Newtonmore every August and there is also a Clan Museum in that town. The home of the current Chief, Sir William Alan MacPherson of Cluny and Blairgowrie, is Newton Castle, Blairgowrie.About the notebook: This notebook is made with cloth woven in mills in the United Kingdom. Notebook pages and paper components are made with acid-free paper from sustainable forests. Boards used in the binding process are made of 100% recycled paper. This hardback notebook is bound in genuine British tartan cloth with an elastic closure, ribbon market, eight perforated end leaves and expandable inner note holder. It contains a removable booklet about the history of clan tartans, and a bookmark that gives information on the MacPherson Red tartan.176 pages.Left side blank, right side ruled. Trimmed page size: 14 × 9 cm.ISBN: 978-1-84934-427-2Kinloch Anderson: The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MacRae Modern Red (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThere are several tartans associated with the MacRae clan, but this attractive MacRae Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with dark blue and dark green. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MalcolmWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – MalcolmOur price: £9.99ViewThe Malcolm tartan is dark blue-green background with contrasting yellow, blue and red lines.The clans Malcolm and MacCallum are joined. The names sound alike and have similar derivations, depending on which history you read. Although some historians suggest they are related, others are of the opinion that they are not genealogically linked at all. In 1779, the chief of the Clan MacCallum, Dugald MacCallum, the ninth of Poltalloch, adopted the name Malcolm after inheriting the Malcolm estate, and the two clans were joined together under the same chief.The name Malcolm has the privilege of being the first name of four of Scotland’s kings and comes from the Early Gaelic words Mael Coluimb meaning monk of Saint Columba (521–597), the Irish Abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity around what is now Scotland. (Mael literally means shavenhead.) MacCallum comes from the Gaelic MacChaluim meaning the son of Callum, while some say MacCallum is derived from Mac Ghille Chaluim which means “son of the disciple of Columba”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Murray of Atholl Ancient (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Murray of Atholl Ancient tartan is soft blend of black, blue and green, with contrasting red lines.It is said that the Murrays are descended from Freskin, a Pictish noble who lived in the time of David I (12th century). Freskin’s grandson William assumed the designation of “de Moravia” reflecting his ownership of land in the area of Moray. The Murrays of Tullibardine, progenitors of the Dukes of Atholl and the chiefs of the Clan Murray of Atholl, are descended from one of William de Moravia’s sons.John Murray (1608–1642) was the son of William, 2nd Earl of Tullibardine (c. 1574–1626) and Dorothea Stewart (heir of the 5th Earl of Atholl). John Murray was created Earl of Atholl in the Peerage of Scotland in 1629. He was the 1st Earl of Atholl with the surname Murray.John Murray, the 2nd Marquess of Atholl (1660–1724) became 1st Duke of Atholl in 1703. The Duke of Atholl is the hereditary chief of Clan Murray. The Duke gathered 4,000 men in an attempt to oppose the Union of 1707. He did not support the Jacobite Rebellions, but his elder son William Murray, Marquess of Tullibardine (1689–1746) and his younger son Lord George Murray (1694–1760) fought for Charles Edward Stuart in the Jacobite army. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – RobertsonWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – RobertsonOur price: £9.99ViewThe Robertson tartan is an intense red crossed with broad bands of navy and dark green.Clan Robertson, the Gaelic Clann DhÒnchaidh, “children of Duncan”, claims descent from Duncan I, King of Scots (who ruled 1034–1040). Donnachadh Reamhar (Duncan the Stout – stout-hearted rather than “fat”) son of Andrew of Atholl, was the first recognised chief of the clan in the early 14th century, and his family were known as Duncanson. Duncan’s relatives and followers are said to have supported Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn (1314). Duncan is said to have been killed at the Battle of Neville’s Cross (1346), and was succeeded by his eldest son Robert. The Robert from whom the clan takes its name though, is Robert Riabach (“Grizzled”) who in 1437 captured the murderers of King James I. As a reward, King James II gave Robert a charter in which all of his lands were made into a feudal barony. The barony in Perthshire was called Struan and the chiefs of the clan were from then onwards known as Robertson of Struan. Afterwards, the clan remained faithful to the Stewart Earls of Atholl. The Robertsons fought under Montrose for Charles I. Alexander Robertson, 17th of Struan (c. 1669–1749), is said to have led 600 clansmen to join Bonnie Dundee (John Graham of Claverhouse, c. 16481689) at the Battle of Killiecrankie (1689), but arrived too late. He fought in the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Rebellions. The clan’s most precious relic, carried by all Robertson chiefs since the battle of Bannockburn, is the Clach na Brataich, a clear stone that was unearthed when the chief’s standard pole was pulled out of the ground while on the march to the battle. The clan’s motto is Virtutis gloria merces, “Glory is the reward of valour”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Royal Stewart (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Royal Stewart (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Royal Stewart tartan is a rich red with black banding, crossed with a myriad of yellow, blue, green and white.The progenitor of this noble family was a Breton, Alan Fitz Flaad (fl. c. 1090c. 1120). In England, Alan was appointed Sheriff of Shropshire by Henry I. His son Walter Fitz Alan (1106–1177), was created High Steward of Scotland in the reign of David I (1084–1153), an office where the duties included managing the King’s finances. The title was made hereditary in the family by Malcolm IV. Walter, the 3rd High Steward of Scotland (d. 1246), assumed the name of his office as his family surname, Stewart. Walter the 6th High Steward (1296–1327) married Marjory Bruce (d. 1246), the daughter of King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329). When David II died (1324–1371), he was succeeded by Walter Stewart’s son, Robert (1316–1390), 1st of the Royal House of Stewart. King Robert II’s eldest son John, succeeded as Robert III (1337–1405). The royal line of male Stewarts was uninterrupted until the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots (1542–1587). Mary was executed for supposedly plotting against Elizabeth I of England. Her son James VI became James I of England (1566–1625) and ruled for 57 years. His son Charles I was beheaded for defying the government and Charles II was deposed because of his religion. James VII and II, married to Mary of Modena, produced a Catholic heir, James Francis Edward Stuart. For this James II was deposed and the family exiled in France. In 1702, claiming his father’s lost throne, James Francis was attainted for treason in London, and his titles forfeited. The Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745 in Scotland, aimed, but failed, to put a Stewart (now Stuart) back on the Scottish throne.The Royal Stewart “sett” is known as “the Royal Tartan”. The Stewarts have several tartans, the Royal being the most famous.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Scott WeatheredWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Scott WeatheredOur price: £9.99ViewThe earthy tones of the Scott Weathered tartan are an elegant blend of green and grey, with pink, white and yellow stripes. This beautiful weathered tartan is based on an imagined natural ageing of the green Clan Scott tartan.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart HuntingWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart HuntingOur price: £9.99ViewThe Stewart Hunting tartan is a dark blend of greens, blues and blacks with thin highlights of yellow and red.The name of this illustrious and royal family is spelled two ways – Stewart and Stuart – but it was not spelled Stuart until the time of Mary, Queen of Scots. Mary, betrothed at the age of five to the Dauphin, Francis II of France, spent 13 years at the French Court. To enable her French associates to pronounce the Stewart name more easily it was decided to respell it without the troublesome “w”. “Hunting” tartans can be dated back to the 16th century. Clans who wore bright colours had the idea of making them more sombre and serviceable for everyday or hunting wear, replacing a prominent colour in the main tartan with a dark colour, but retaining the arrangement of the stripes so that they still showed the clan pattern. There are over 30 tartans associated with the Stewart clan. The differences incorporate different branches of the clan, different areas of origin and further variations using the labels “dress” and “hunting”. Royal Stewart tartan is dominated by a vibrant red, Stewart of Appin has lighter greens and blues and the Fraser Stewart of Atholl tartan is mostly red with blocks of blue, green and purple. The Stewart Hunting tartan is a variation on the Stewart tartan but is predominantly green and black with overchecks of red, yellow and blue. In 1848, Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert bought Balmoral Castle. Prince Albert took care of interior decoration, where he used red Royal Stewart and the green Stewart Hunting tartan for carpets, and Dress Stewart for curtains and upholstery.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Stewart Modern Camel tartan featured on this notebook is predominantly light brown in colour, with white black and red, and has a light and contemporary feel to it. It is one of over 30 tartans associated with Clan Stewart. The differences incorporate different branches, different areas of origin and further variations using labels such as “dress” and “hunting”. The name Stewart reflects the Clan’s illustrious origins. The original family name, from Brittany, had been fitz Alan. Walter fitz Alan (1110–1177) was High Steward of Scotland during the reign of David I (1124–1153). The name Stewart is derived from the title of that office, and Walter (d. 1246), 3rd High Steward of Scotland took Stewart as the family surname. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedWaverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Wallace Modern RedOur price: £9.99ViewThe Wallace Modern Red tartan is predominantly red with black,and touches of yellow.
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