You are not signed in. Would you like to sign in or register?My shopping bag (0 items. Total £0.00)

Browse our …

You've viewed …

You haven't yet viewed any products on our store. If you've been here before, you may need to sign in.

Anne McCall, the Director of RSPB Scotland, said: “This is a hugely exciting announcement for Scotland and an unmis… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 week ago

A witty customer has just said "Brexit for the UK is a bit like 'Stingray' (if you're old enough to remember the Br… twitter.com/i/web/status…1 week ago

They work very hard and are organised and friendly. Thank you for doing that - with best wishes from Waverley Books in Scotland. 1 week ago

Follow @WaverleyBooks

Waverley Scotland - Tartan Notebooks and Journals from Scotland

This beautiful high quality tartan notebook range uses genuine tartan cloth for the binding and comes from a quality Scottish publisher Waverley Books, based in Glasgow. Established for over 26 years the name Waverley Books is known for its high production values. The authentic tartan cloth is sourced by Kinloch Anderson, a family owned company, based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

AUSTRALIA: If you are reading this in Australia, and wish to place an order for a notebook/journal please note that we have a distributor : Peribo link here: http://www.peribo.com.au/titles-by-publisher/waverley-books

The team at Peribo will be happy to help you with your order.

USA: If you are reading this in USA, and wish to place an order for a notebook/journal please note that we have a distributor : Waverley West https://www.waverleywest.net/

Waverley Scotland - What Tartan can I wear?Waverley Scotland - What Tartan can I wear?Most people wear a tartan that they have a family connection with, and there are over 3,500 tartans in existence. Most people research their own family tartan and decide which one to wear. Most people first research the surnames of their grandparents, or further back, to find out which tartans or clans they are involved with. There is a huge amount of information online and in specialist books to help. Many people who cannot find information about their Scottish family background choose to wear a 'district' tartan and there are many of these. It may be named after a city or certain area of Scotland. Of course, 'clans' began because people living in a certain area would wear the same tartan because of the local dyes and cloth available from the local weaver, or because of an association with the local clan chief or family. 'Sett' is the name given to the pattern of a tartan. The sett was determined by the colours/dyes available and how the handloom was set up. Your own tartan: If you prefer to have your own tartan, (it can be expensive) you can start with an existing one and change some of the colours or proportions, or you can start from scratch. Once designed, you need to check your tartan with the Scottish Register of Tartans https://www.tartanregister.gov.uk/ to ensure it does not copy an existing one. And then you have to register it. However... most producers and weavers respectfully advise you study tartan and ask for some advice before you start. Many companies and people now have their own tartans.To find out more about the story of each tartan, you can read the history of each one online or in one of the many excellent books available. The origin of tartans tells us something always about the history of Scotland, and develops our knowledge too of cloth, dyes and how people lived.Each of the tartan commonplace notebooks comes with a bookmark that gives a brief history of the origins of that tartan. Deirdre Kinloch Anderson has written about the history of tartans and her family company also in her book: A Scottish Tradition. £25.00 available from Waverley Books.To read about the origins of the phrase 'Commonplace Notebook' please see our section on 'The Commonplace Notebook' which we found out about while researching some of our books on Robert Burns.  There are 6 products in this category.Just what is a 'Commonplace' notebook then?Just what is a 'Commonplace' notebook then?Waverley Scotland, an independent publishing company based in Glasgow, has created a range of Tartan Commonplace Notebooks, bound in genuine tartan cloth. The tartan cloth is supplied by and produced with the authority of Kinloch Anderson Scotland, holders of Royal Warrants of Appointment as Tailors and Kiltmakers to HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh and HRH The Prince of Wales. Kinloch Anderson Scotland were established in 1868 and still operate today as tailors and kiltmakers, specialists in tartan and highland dress, and are based in Leith, Edinburgh. Three years ago, in our detailed research on a book called 'Robert Burns in Edinburgh', we realised how widespread the use of the 'Commonplace' notebook had been. Robert Burns used one; many in the Enlightenment period used commonplace notebooks. Commonplace books (or commonplaces) were a way to compile and accumulate knowledge, thoughts and ideas into books, filled with items of every kind: quotes, letters, poems, anecdotes, sketches, tables of weights and measures, medical recipes, proverbs, prayers, and legal formulas. They were used by readers, writers, students, and scholars as an aid for remembering useful concepts or facts they had learned.By the 17th century, commonplacing was formally taught to university students. By the early eighteenth century commonplace books had become information and management devices .They were used by many thinkers and scientists of the Scottish Enlightenment, such as Frances Hutcheson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart, Thomas Reid, Adam Ferguson, John Playfair, Joseph Black and James Hutton. Commonplacing was particularly attractive to authors including Robert Burns, Walter Scott, John Milton, Francis Bacon, E.M. Forster, W.H. Auden, Arthur Conan Doyle and Virginia Woolf.Today, despite the developments of electronic and digital management recording systems, the demand for high quality notebooks remains. Especially when you have forgotten your charger. Over the years Waverley has researched and published many aspects of Scottish history, and historical figures, and we are passionate about Scottish heritage and tartan. And if you wish to see one of Robert Burns' commonplace notebooks, there is one proudly on display at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, Alloway.There is 1 product in this category.

Found 76 products.

Sort in order. Show items per page.
Page: 12
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Stewart Modern Camel tartan featured on this large format notebook is predominantly light brown in colour, with white black and red, and has a light and contemporary feel to it. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (pocket)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebook – Stewart Modern Camel (pocket)Our price: £9.99ViewThe Stewart Modern Camel tartan featured on this notebook is predominantly light brown in colour, with white black and red, and has a light and contemporary feel to it. It is one of over 30 tartans associated with Clan Stewart. The differences incorporate different branches, different areas of origin and further variations using labels such as “dress” and “hunting”. The name Stewart reflects the Clan’s illustrious origins. The original family name, from Brittany, had been fitz Alan. Walter fitz Alan (1110–1177) was High Steward of Scotland during the reign of David I (1124–1153). The name Stewart is derived from the title of that office, and Walter (d. 1246), 3rd High Steward of Scotland took Stewart as the family surname. Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Black Watch (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Black Watch tartan is a rich, dark green and blue laced with black .The Black Watch was formed in the wake of the unsuccessful 1715 Jacobite Rebellion, where James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1766), son of the deposed James II, fought to put the exiled House of Stuart back on the throne. From 1725, General George Wade (1673–1748) formed six military companies from the clans of the Campbells, Grants, Frasers and Munros. They were stationed in small detachments across the Highlands to prevent fighting among the clans, deter raiding, and to assist in enforcing laws against the carrying of weapons. In short, they were tasked with protecting the interests of the Hanoverian throne in Scotland. Wade issued an order in May 1725, for the companies all to wear plaid of the same sort and colour. Their original uniform was made from a 12-yard long plaid of the tartan that we know now as the Black Watch tartan. They wore a scarlet jacket and waistcoat, with the tartan cloth worn over the left shoulder. The name is said to come from the dark tartan they wore, hence “black”, and from the fact that they were policing the land, hence “watch”.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Buchanan Reproduction (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Buchanan Reproduction (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Buchanan Reproduction tartan has a warm palette of reds, browns, golds and greens.It is claimed by the Clan Buchanan that it can trace its line back to a son of one of the kings of Ulster, Anselan O Kyan, who came to Argyll in 1016. He fought for King Malcolm II against the Danes and, as reward, was given the lands of Buchanan, to the east of Loch Lomond near Killearn in Stirlingshire. Two Gaelic names are given as the root of the placename Buchanan, Mac a Chanonaich (“the son of the canon”) and Buth Chanain (meaning “house or seat of the canon”).In 1225 another Anselan, recorded as Absalom of Buchanan, was granted lands in Buchanan by Maldouen, Earl of Lennox (d. 1250). And in 1231, King Alexander II (1214–49) made a charter awarding other lands in Buchanan to Gilbert, Seneschal (an administrative officer in the houses of important nobles) of the Earl of Lennox. The Buchanans supported King Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Independence. They fought at the battles of Flodden, Pinkie and Langside. The clan prospered in the time of David II in the 14th century, however, towards the end of the 17th century the house and lands of Buchanan were sold to the Marquess of Montrose, Chief of Clan Graham.Reproduction tartans are also sometimes called “weathered” or “muted”. The tartan itself is identical to the tartan of that clan name, but the colours are “muted” because they have been reproduced to match pieces of cloth, found in homesteads and battlefields, that have been weathered by exposure to the Scottish climate.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Caledonia (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Caledonia (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe vibrant Caledonia tartan has a sea-green background overlaid with broad red banding, with accents of black, white and yellow.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Elliot (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Elliot (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Elliot tartan is a bright blue with black banding and bright red accents.The Elliots appear as a clan with a chief in the Scottish Borders around the 15th century, with territory around Upper Liddesdale. They were notorious Border Reivers – families, from both England and Scotland, who raided the Border lands. The Elliots are said to be of Breton origin, coming to Britain with William the Conqueror’s invading army in 1066. Elliots – with many varied spellings of the name – settled all over the British Isles. They are based at Glenshee in Angus – Elliots gave their name to Elliot Water in Angus – but made a move to Teviotdale in the Borders around the time of Robert the Bruce.The principal family in the early 15th century was Elliot of Redheugh. In 1426, a John Elwalde of Teviotdale is recorded. In 1476, Robert Ellot of Redheugh appears as the 10th chief of the clan. Robert Ellot built a strong tower on a cliff overlooking the ford on Hermitage Water in Liddesdale in 1470. This was just one of about 100-strong towers around Liddesdale which belonged to the Ellots and which they shared with the Clan Armstrong, another Border Reiver clan. The Elliots of Stobs, also in the Borders, can be traced back to Gawain Elliot of Stobs in the late 16th century, who was descended from the Elliots of Redheugh. Elliot is an adapted version of the old English name Elwold. There is also a theory that it is derived from the name of an old Breton tribe, Halgoët, based on the Breton word for willow or saugh tree. The names Elwald, Elwalde and Ellot were common variations.
Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Isle of Skye (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Isle of Skye (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Isle of Skye tartan blends rich, heathery purples with shades of misty and mossy greens.The Isle of Skye, long celebrated for its beauty in poetry and song, is situated off the west coast of Scotland, connected to the mainland by a bridge. The island’s largest town is Portree, famous for the brightly coloured houses in its harbour.Skye’s history includes a period of Norse rule and domination by Clan MacLeod and Clan Donald. It suffered particularly in the 18th-century following the Jacobite Risings, and with the breaking up of the clan system, and following the Highland Clearances that led entire communities to have to leave their land – some via forced emigrations. After the failed Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, Flora MacDonald helped to rescue Prince Charles Edward Stuart from the Hanoverian troops, disguising him and taking him to Skye to hide.Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Royal Stewart (large)Waverley Scotland Genuine Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks – Royal Stewart (large)Our price: £14.99ViewThe Royal Stewart tartan is a rich red with black banding, crossed with a myriad of yellow, blue, green and white.The progenitor of this noble family was a Breton, Alan Fitz Flaad (fl. c. 1090c. 1120). In England, Alan was appointed Sheriff of Shropshire by Henry I. His son Walter Fitz Alan (1106–1177), was created High Steward of Scotland in the reign of David I (1084–1153), an office where the duties included managing the King’s finances. The title was made hereditary in the family by Malcolm IV. Walter, the 3rd High Steward of Scotland (d. 1246), assumed the name of his office as his family surname, Stewart. Walter the 6th High Steward (1296–1327) married Marjory Bruce (d. 1246), the daughter of King Robert the Bruce (1274–1329). When David II died (1324–1371), he was succeeded by Walter Stewart’s son, Robert (1316–1390), 1st of the Royal House of Stewart. King Robert II’s eldest son John, succeeded as Robert III (1337–1405). The royal line of male Stewarts was uninterrupted until the reign of Mary, Queen of Scots (1542–1587). Mary was executed for supposedly plotting against Elizabeth I of England. Her son James VI became James I of England (1566–1625) and ruled for 57 years. His son Charles I was beheaded for defying the government and Charles II was deposed because of his religion. James VII and II, married to Mary of Modena, produced a Catholic heir, James Francis Edward Stuart. For this James II was deposed and the family exiled in France. In 1702, claiming his father’s lost throne, James Francis was attainted for treason in London, and his titles forfeited. The Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745 in Scotland, aimed, but failed, to put a Stewart (now Stuart) back on the Scottish throne.The Royal Stewart “sett” is known as “the Royal Tartan”. The Stewarts have several tartans, the Royal being the most famous.Waverley Scotland Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks merchandising display unitWaverley Scotland Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks merchandising display unitOur price: £0.00ViewAn acrylic stand designed to hold 24 copies of the pocket size Waverley Scotland Tartan Cloth Commonplace Notebooks.Waverley Scotland Tartan Commonplace Guest Book – Thistle Tartan (Kinloch Anderson)Waverley Scotland Tartan Commonplace Guest Book – Thistle Tartan (Kinloch Anderson)Our price: £20.00ViewNothing says summer more than a wedding, anniversary, or friends to stay, so the Waverley authentic tartan cloth Guest Book (size 15.2cm x 22.7cm) with 192 pages is perfect for capturing the moment with messages, doodles, and photos for a lasting record of your event. Waverley Tartan Notebooks worldwide: Each real cloth tartan notebook is uniqueWaverley Tartan Notebooks worldwide: Each real cloth tartan notebook is uniqueOur price: £0.00ViewPlease note: Because of the way the cloth is cut to make the cover for the notebooks, the pattern may change from notebook to notebook depending on the sett and the cut of the cloth. This makes your notebook unique!Waverley: Tartan Worldwide - Arabic translation  - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - Arabic translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookOur price: £0.00ViewHere is the Arabic translation taken from the leaflet about the history of tartan that comes with each Waverley Scotland Real Cloth Tartan Notebook.
Waverley: Tartan Worldwide - Chinese Mandarin translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - Chinese Mandarin translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookOur price: £0.00ViewWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - German translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - German translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookOur price: £0.00ViewWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - Japanese translation -This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - Japanese translation -This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookOur price: £0.00ViewHere is the Japanese translation taken from the leaflet about the history of tartan that comes with each Waverley Scotland Real Cloth Tartan Notebook.Waverley: Tartan Worldwide - Spanish translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookWaverley: Tartan Worldwide - Spanish translation - This is an extract from the multi-lingual leaflet which accompanies each Waverley Tartan notebookOur price: £0.00View
Sort in order. Show items per page.
Page: 12
Loading